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Professional and Technical Occupations




Athletes, coaches, umpires, and related workers:
Participate in competitive professional athletic events as a player, coach, manager, umpire, or judge. Include athletic trainers, scouts, official scorers, and timekeepers.

  • 1998 employment: 52,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: Faster than average
  • Most significant source of training: Long-term on-the-job training

Assessors:
Appraise real and personal property to determine its fair value. May assess taxes in accordance with prescribed schedules.

  • 1998 employment: 22,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: About as fast as average
  • Most significant source of training: Bachelor’s degree

Directors, religious activities and education:
Direct and coordinate activities of a denominational group to meet religious needs of students. Plan, organize, and direct religious school programs designed to promote religious education among members of religious institution. Provide counseling and guidance relative to marital, health, financial, and religious problems.

  • 1998 employment: 112,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: Faster than average
  • Most significant source of training: Bachelor’s degree

Farm and home management advisors:
Advise, instruct, and assist individuals and families engaged in agriculture, agricultural related processes, or home economics activities. Demonstrate procedures and apply research findings to solve problems; instruct and train in product development, sales, and the utilization of machinery and equipment to promote general welfare. Include county agricultural agents, feed and farm management advisers, home economists, and extension service advisers.

  • 1998 employment: 10,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: A decline
  • Most significant source of training: Bachelor’s degree

Psychiatric technicians:
Provide nursing care to mentally ill, emotionally disturbed, or mentally retarded patients. Participate in rehabilitation and treatment programs. Help with personal hygiene. Administer oral medications and hypodermic injections, following physician’s prescriptions and hospital procedures. Monitor patient’s physical and emotional well-being and report to medical staff.

  • 1998 employment: 66,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: About as fast as average
  • Most significant source of training: Postsecondary vocational training

Radiation therapists:
Provide radiation therapy to patients as prescribed by a radiologist according to established practices and standards. Duties may include reviewing prescription and diagnosis; acting as liaison with physician and supportive care personnel; preparing equipment, such as immobilization, treatment, and protection devices; and maintaining records, reports, and files. May assist in dosimetry procedures and tumor localization.

  • 1998 employment: 12,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: About as fast as average
  • Most significant source of training: Associate degree

Residential counselors:
Coordinate activities for residents of care and treatment institutions, boarding schools, college fraternities or sororities, children homes, or similar establishments. Work includes developing or assisting in the development of program plans for individuals, maintaining household records, and assigning rooms. Counsel residents in identifying and resolving social or other problems. Order supplies and determine need for maintenance, repairs, and furnishings.

  • 1998 employment: 190,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: Much faster than average
  • Most significant source of training: Bachelor’s degree

Tax preparers:
Prepare tax returns for individuals or small businesses but do not have the background or responsibilities of an accredited accountant or certified public accountant. May work for established tax return firm.

  • 1998 employment: 79,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: About as fast as average
  • Most significant source of training: Moderate-term on-the-job training

Title examiners, abstractors, and searchers:
Title examiners: Search public records and examine titles to determine legal condition of property title. Copy or summarize (abstracts) recorded documents which affect condition of title to property (e.g., mortgages, trust deeds, and contracts). May prepare and issue policy that guarantees legality of title. Abstractors: Summarize pertinent legal or insurance details or sections of statutes or case law from reference books for purpose of examination, proof, or ready reference. Search out titles to determine if title deed is correct. Searchers: Compile list of mortgages, deeds, contracts, judgments, and other instruments pertaining to title by searching public and private records of real estate or title insurance company.

  • 1998 employment: 30,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: A decline
  • Most significant source of training: Moderate-term on-the-job training

Veterinary technologists and technicians:
Perform medical tests in a laboratory environment for use in the treatment and diagnosis of diseases in animals. Prepare vaccines and serums for prevention of diseases. Prepare tissue samples, take blood samples, and execute laboratory tests such as urinalysis and blood counts. Clean and sterilize instruments and materials and maintain equipment and machines.

  • 1998 employment: 32,000
  • Projected 1998-2008 employment change: About as fast as average
  • Most significant source of training: Associates degree

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