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Salary, Wages, Pay: Loan Counselors and Officers




Median annual earnings of loan counselors were $32,010 in 2002. The middle 50 percent earned between $26,330 and $41,660. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $22,800, while the top 10 percent earned more than $57,400.

Median annual earnings of loan officers were $43,980 in 2002. The middle 50 percent earned between $32,360 and $62,160. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $25,790, while the top 10 percent earned more than $88,450. Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of loan officers in 2002 were:

Activities related to credit intermediation $47,240
Management of companies and enterprises 46,420
Nondepository credit intermediation 44,770
Depository credit intermediation 41,450

The form of compensation for loan officers varies. Most loan officers are paid a commission that is based on the number of loans they originate. In this way, commissions are used to motivate loan officers to bring in more loans. Some institutions pay only salaries, while others pay their loan officers a salary plus a commission or bonus based on the number of loans originated. Banks and other lenders sometimes offer their loan officers free checking privileges and somewhat lower interest rates on personal loans.

According to a salary survey conducted by Robert Half International, a staffing services firm specializing in accounting and finance, mortgage loan officers earned between $36,000 and $45,750 in 2002; consumer loan officers with 1 to 3 years of experience earned between $42,250 and $56,750; and commercial loan officers with 1 to 3 years of experience made between $48,000 and $64,500. With over 3 years of experience, commercial loan officers made between $66,000 and $92,000, and consumer loan officers earned between $55,500 and $75,750. Earnings of loan officers with graduate degrees or professional certifications were approximately 10 to 15 percent higher than these figures. Loan officers who are paid on a commission basis usually earn more than those on salary only, and those who work for smaller banks generally earn less than those employed by larger institutions.