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Jobs Outlook: Instructional Coordinators




Employment of instructional coordinators is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through the year 2012. Over the next decade, instructional coordinators will be instrumental in developing new curricula to meet the demands of a changing society and in training the teacher workforce. Although budget cuts, particularly in the near term, may negatively impact employment to some extent, a continuing emphasis on improving the quality of education is expected to result in a relatively steady and increasing demand for these workers. As increasing Federal, State and local standards impel more schools to focus on improving educational quality and student performance, growing numbers of coordinators will be needed to incorporate the standards into curriculums and make sure teachers and administrators are informed of the changes. Opportunities are expected to be best for those who specialize in subject areas that have been targeted for improvement by the No Child Left Behind Act—namely, reading, math, and science.

Instructional coordinators also will be needed to provide classes on using technology in the classroom, to keep teachers up-to-date on changes in their fields, and to demonstrate new teaching techniques. Additional job growth for instructional coordinators will stem from the increasing emphasis on lifelong learning and on programs for students with special needs, including those for whom English is a second language. These students often require more educational resources and consolidated planning and management within the educational system.