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Salary, Wages, Pay: Demonstrators, Product Promoters, and Models




Demonstrators and product promoters had median hourly earnings of $9.80 in 2002. The middle 50 percent earned between $7.99 and $13.83. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $7.04, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $20.59. Median hourly earnings in the industries that employed the largest numbers of demonstrators and product promoters in 2002 were as follows:

Employment services $10.41
Other support services 8.60
Advertising and related services 8.27

Employers of demonstrators, product promoters, and models generally pay for job-related travel expenses. Median hourly earnings of models were $10.29 in 2002. The middle 50 percent earned between $8.01 and $13.65. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $6.70, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $17.62. Earnings vary for different types of modeling, and depend on the experience and reputation of the model. Female models typically earn more than male models for similar work. Hourly earnings can be relatively high, particularly for supermodels and others in high demand, but models may not have work every day, and jobs may last only a few hours. Models occasionally receive clothing or clothing discounts instead of, or in addition to, regular earnings. Almost all models work with agents, and pay 15 to 20 percent of their earnings in return for an agentís services. Models who do not find immediate work may receive payments, called advances, from agents to cover promotional and living expenses. Models must provide their own health and retirement benefits.