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Salary, Wages, Pay: Counter and Rental Clerks




Counter and rental clerks typically start at the minimum wage, which, in establishments covered by Federal law, was $5.15 an hour in 2003. In some States, the law sets the minimum wage higher, and establishments must pay at least that amount. Wages also tend to be higher in areas where there is intense competition for workers. In addition to wages, some counter and rental clerks receive commissions, based on the number of contracts they complete or services they sell.

Median hourly earnings of counter and rental clerks in 2002 were $8.31. The middle 50 percent earned between $6.89 and $10.91 an hour. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $6.03 an hour, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $15.10 an hour. Median hourly earnings in the industries employing the largest number of counter and rental clerks in 2002 were as follows:

Automobile dealers $16.09
Automotive equipment rental and leasing 9.69
Lessors of real estate 9.19
Drycleaning and laundry services 7.34
Amusement and recreation services 7.30

Full-time workers typically receive health and life insurance, paid vacation, and sick leave. Benefits for counter and rental clerks who work part time or for independent stores tend to be significantly less than for those who work full time. Many companies offer discounts to both full-time and part-time employees on the services they provide.